How to Support a Friend

More information coming soon!


Abusive Relationship

Relationship abuse is the use of intimidation and/or force by one person to maintain power over another. It can include any form of verbal, emotional, mental, physical spiritual and/or sexual abuse or violence, and can happen in all types of relationships. In an abusive relationship it is not unusual for the abuser to express remorse after a violent outburst and then ask for forgiveness, promising that “it will never happen again.” Unfortunately, it usually does, thus perpetuating a cycle of abuse.

If you feel your friend is a victim of an abusive relationship, please click here for more information

Eating Disorder

An eating disorder can be characterized by extreme thoughts, emotions or attitudes about food, body size and/or shape. Often, it is a dangerous response to psychological and/or emotional stress in a person’s life or past experiences. The three most common types of eating disorders are anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. It is possible to suffer from more than one eating disorder at a time.

If you feel your friend is experiencing an eating disorder, please click here for more information

Low Self-Esteem

Self-esteem is related to your opinion of yourself. High self-esteem is a good opinion of yourself, and low self-esteem is a bad opinion of yourself. The causes of low self-esteem can be deeply rooted in a person’s past, sometimes stemming from childhood experiences. Low self-esteem can result from or contribute to other conditions including, but not limited to, abusive relationships, body image issues, eating disorders, depression, and anxiety.

If you feel your friend is experiencing low self-esteem, please click here for more information

Pregnancy

Every individual has the fundamental right to make choices about their pregnancy. Anyone facing an unplanned pregnancy will need to make some of the most important decisions of their life. Your friend has the right to choose an option they feel is best for them at this time in their life. They may decide to carry the pregnancy to term, to keep the baby or place the child for adoption, or they may choose to have an abortion. As a friend, it is important that you respect your friend’s decisions, regardless of your own personal values or beliefs. After your friend has made a choice, you can continue to be supportive in the way you feel the most comfortable.

If you feel your friend is experiencing unplanned pregnancy, please click here for more information

Sexual Assault

Relationship abuse is the use of intimidation and/or force by one person to maintain power over another. It can include any form of verbal, emotional, mental, physical spiritual and/or sexual abuse or violence, and can happen in all types of relationships. In an abusive relationship it is not unusual for the abuser to express remorse after a violent outburst and then ask for forgiveness, promising that “it will never happen again.” Unfortunately, it usually does, thus perpetuating a cycle of abuse.

If you feel your friend is a victim of an sexual assault, please click here for more information

Sexual Harrassment

Sexual harassment is any unwelcome sexual advance. This includes requests for sexual favors and other verbal, visual or physical conduct of a sexual nature that interferes with your work or education. It may also create an intimidating, hostile or offensive work or learning environment. Sexual harassment commonly occurs, but is infrequently discussed, as it often makes people feel uneasy. We hear people joke about it, but when it happens, it can cause emotional, psychological, physical and material harm. The specific impact varies from person to person. Remember, sexual harassment is against the law and university policy. For UC Davis Policy, go to: http://manuals.ucdavis.edu/PPM/380/380-12.htm

If you feel your friend is a victim of a sexual harrassment, please click here for more information

Stalking Situations

Stalking is unwanted pursuit. Many victims are stalked by current or former intimate partners such as dating partners, spouses, or cohabiting partners. What was viewed initially as positive and/or romantic attention, may turn into the repeated unwanted attention, harassment, and contact that characterizes stalking. However, it’s important to remember that a stalker can also be an acquaintance or someone you do not know.

If you feel your friend is experiencing a stalking situation, please click here for more information